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There's a thing called 'Yes Day' that was talked about in a picture book in 2009, according to the Star Tribune. The book is called 'Yes Day' and since then many families have given 'Yes Day' a try themselves. Actually, I remember doing something similar to 'Yes Day' when I was a kid, before 2009. But what the heck is 'Yes Day'?

Basically what happens on 'Yes Day' is the kids are in charge. Whatever they want to do (within reason, of course, which we will talk about later) the parents' job is to always say yes! Your child wants Reese's on their pancakes? On 'Yes Day' they can.

Naturally, the idea of being in charge is very appealing to kids. But there's actually a benefit for the parents too.

Art Sesma is an associate professor and chairman of the Psychology Department at St. Catherine University in St. Paul. He also teaches child psychology according to the Star Tribune. He says that, first of all, 'Yes Day' "'reinforces that what kids really want is their parents’ time and attention'". As for the benefit to parents, “'Parents can use this experience to become more mindful of when and why they say no. Do they do it reflexively, because it’s convenient?'” 'Yes Day' Is a chance to reflect on that and change your ways as a parent for the better.

When I was a kid we did a version of 'Yes Day' for a few years. My parents would set aside 2 days each summer, one for me and one for my younger brother. For our respective 'days' we got to plan out what we were going to do. I remember one day I wanted to shop at the Mall of America all day and then go to a movie, so that's what we did! It was always so much fun.

Setting boundaries for 'Yes Day' is usually good. Depending on your situation, set a budget for the day. You'll also want to make clear that they cannot do any activities that could cause injury, like if they want to go on a bike ride, you still have to wear your helmet.

If you try 'Yes Day' in your family, let me know how it goes!